A Simple Life Well Lived

Posted: December 19, 2013 in MGTOW, Red Pill
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

By: MonkeyWerks

Can you guess which position in the following story she took and the one I took?  If you guessed correctly then you would see the problem not just in the last relationship I was in, but you can probably see a version of this story in many failed relationships.

As in my case, she wanted me to restart my business at full capacity incurring the debt and expenses in doing so and forcing me to go back to working 12-16 hours per day 6 days per week.

I preferred to work from home and make the money I needed and a little bit more and homeschool my daughters, tend my garden, raise my bunnies and do whatever else interests me.  I have figured that my business would take about 4-6 hours per day and that I would make more than enough income.  That will leave plenty of time to do all that I wish to do and chase young hotties if I desire.

Oh, and read Code Olive by AFT.  It seems to fit the paradox.

At least I will not have to endure her old nagging ass anymore.

The following was found on the MGTOW forms.

A Simple Life Well Lived

The businessman was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellow fin tuna. The businessman complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them. The Mexican replied only a little while.

The businessman then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish? The Mexican said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs. The businessman then asked, but what do you do with the rest of your time? The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take a siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos; I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The businessman scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats; eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman, you would sell directly to the processor and eventually open your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?” To which the businessman replied, “15-20 years.” “But what then, señor?” The businessman laughed and said, “That’s the best part! When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions.” “Millions, señor? Then what?” The businessman said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take a siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.”

The fisherman, still smiling, looked up and said, “Isn’t that what I’m doing right now?”

-Author Unknown

Success

We live in a world in which being successful is everything. Success is measured by power, popularity, control, achievement, and winning. Having more and being more is success. The businessman measured success by the accumulation of wealth and by living a plush life. He held a Harvard MBA, millions of dollars, and status as a powerful businessman. “The person with the most toys wins” is a fitting motto.

The businessman encouraged the fisherman to accumulate “toys,” too. “Buy a bigger boat,” then “buy several boats,” and eventually buy a “fleet of fishing boats.” The businessman claimed all this would lead to power and status when “you would sell directly to the processor and eventually open your own cannery.” As his own boss, the businessman ventured the Mexican would amass “control” and more wealth through an “expanding enterprise.”

Patiently the fisherman listened and then asked an intelligent question, “how long will this all take?” To which the businessman replied, “15-20 years.” There’s danger in waiting to live the life that you really want to live. Like the businessman, we can easily spend forty years climbing to the top of the financial ladder only to find it is leaning against the wrong wall. We didn’t address life issues about faith, contribution, success, suffering, or love.

Possessions and wealth are not enough. While comforting, wealth cannot fulfill. Benjamin Franklin was of the opinion, “Money never made a man happy yet, nor will it. The more a man has, the more he wants. Instead of filling a vacuum, it makes one.” Wealth may momentarily help us to escape emptiness; it cannot cure it.

The Mexican fisherman lived in a small village, fished in a small boat, and led a simple life. His little way made, for him, a happy life. The Mexican found success in a simple life well lived. The quality of his relationships, the depth of his character, and the sincerity of his commitments to family measured his success.

The fisherman had a specific view of a life well lived. “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take a siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos.” To be as specific as possible helps to succeed in living a good life. His little way made, for the Mexican fisherman, a “full and busy life.”

The businessman accumulated money to support his retirement. It was wise to plan for the future. Yet, what sort of life was he living in the present? The businessman was so future-oriented he hadn’t taken sufficient time to question what the future looked like. The businessman was living for what the Mexican already enjoyed—a simple life well lived.

I’m not suggesting selling everything and moving to a small coastal Mexican village (although, personally this is an appealing idea). We should aspire to be successful in our careers. My brother received a $40,000 bonus last year, and my sister recently passed her exam to pursue her doctorate. These are perfectly legitimate forms of success. We run into trouble when the only thing we are living for is success that is self-serving.

Rudyard Kipling, giving a commencement address at McGill University in Montreal, said there was one striking thing that deserves to be remembered about people. Warning the students against an over-concern for money, power, or popularity, he said, “Some day you will meet a man who cares for none of these things. Then you will know how poor you are.” The businessman discovered how poor he was when he met the Mexican fisherman.

Advertisements
Comments
  1. […] Women love opportunistically while men love idealistically. I think Rollo calls this the “war brides dynamic.” Alice Thomas Ellis famously said, “There is no reciprocity. Men love women. Women love children. Children love hamsters. Hamsters don’t love anyone.” Women have to adjust to the new men that killed their husbands and took them as war brides, so they are evolutionarily adapted to loving whichever strong man has the power, thus ensuring her own survival and, most importantly, the survival of her children. This dynamic likely explains rape/ravishment fantasies as well; if you’re going to get raped by the commander of the conquering tribe, you may as well enjoy it and hope he doesn’t kill your children like he killed your husband. Humanity is messy business, there’s no point in being angry at women for being the way they are, hell, you probably should blame men for being violent and starting all the wars in the first place. […]

    • monkeywerks says:

      Rollos commentary on war brides was excellent, bI see this particular issue as her uncontrolled hypergamy more than anything else and of course her hamster running all out in order to justify her decision to end the relationship. I do blame men who have allowed womens unfettered hypergamy to control our modern society and the new norms that have been established since the inception of feminism. Of course I understand the age old belief of male disposability. I am of the opinion that I am no longer disposable and that all of my labors should benefit me first and any woman I happen to be with second. That was the bigger point I was hoping the readers would see with this article, although I will explore this concept in later essays in more detail.

      In the end it is good for me that this relationship ended. The timing kind of sucks but as time goes on I become more comfortable being alone. Before I got married I was content being alone and as time progresses the contentment grows.

  2. […] I did not express my thoughts about my desire for a simpler financial life I am fairly confident she would have seen me as someone who could fulfill her Hypergamy and would […]

  3. […] our lifestyle in order to reduce the need for financial resources.  In other words we adopt a simpler lifestyle.  Sometimes this simpler lifestyle gives us a means to a sort of financial independence.  I have […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s